FacesOfFallForeword - bennettfilm

Faces Of Fall - Foreword

2/4/2019

"Familiar Faces"

     It’s the start of a new year, one of the many abstract creations of man’s mind which we all take much too seriously. Time, seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years. We use it to measure our lives; how much we have used, how much we have left. Are there other metrics that would better describe to us how much one truly has lived? Perhaps experiences, or acquaintances made? Regardless, I am still excited for this year and I am happy to share my first body of work of 2019, “Faces of Fall.”

     I shot these images last year, during the fall season both near my home around Salt Lake City, UT and in several areas of Colorado. A handful of these photographs were taken while out with friends, others with my wife, and most while wandering off on my own, but all were taken while connecting with nature. Having grown up in sunny San Diego, CA, I was more or less a stranger to the Fall season for much of my life. Sure, I had seen it before in photographs and movies, but I had never actually experienced it, until I first moved to Utah back in 2012, in the month of September, right at the start of the changing colors. It quickly became my favorite time of the year for many reasons; the mild weather, the mix of snowy mountains and colorful foliage, the thinning of crowds on the trails. It might also be correlated with the fact that it was the season I was born in, being a Scorpio. Over the last few years, having become more fascinated by and dependent on nature, I have found myself looking forward to the arrival of this season more and more, and even traveling to the other side of the earth in order to be able to enjoy it a second time each year.

“Transience”

     It’s both an exciting and reverent time of year as plants seem to burst with color and life for one last show as they prepare to drop all of their leaves before the long slumber. The trees whose branches fail to create full, lush canopies of leaves during the spring, unfortunately will not survive the winter months. Trees have leaves in order to create glucose, the same sugar that powers our brains, this is what keeps the tree growing and alive. Trees can detect the arrival of winter, not by the change in temperature, but actually the angle of the sunlight. This is the most foolproof way they can prepare themselves and not be caught by winter off guard. They drop their leaves in order to store all of the glucose within, and this mixes with the water in each and every cell of their being, to keep the water from freezing during the cold, winter months. Without enough glucose produced during the spring and summer, they won’t have enough to avoid their insides from turning to ice.

"White Flames"

     Understanding the processes of trees allows me to tell each spring, which ones had a rough winter and which ones will not survive the next. Life as a plant is an incredible struggle, and they go through it all for what exactly? Why doesn’t every living thing just give up when faced with challenges that seem too great to overcome? When I walk through forests, I always make a point to gently touch and maybe even hug a few of the trees, so I can feel their energy. I try to express to them my gratitude for the oxygen they create for me, for allowing me to breathe clean air on this planet. What I feel in return is always an overwhelming feeling of happiness and joy. They are celebrating life.


     I hope you enjoy this new gallery as I have tried to portray and share the different faces of the season as the trees transition from green to bare. I was lucky to encounter a great variety of weather conditions, lighting, and subject matter this season, making it one of the most memorable yet. 

     I invite you to browse through a few times, perhaps while you play some gentle background music, and as you look at each image, maybe try to understand what it was that moved me to photograph it. Until next time!


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